How can we support our Teenagers?

It is getting harder and harder. For all of us. And the teenagers are really struggling. I work with several teenagers and have noticed feelings of apathy and depression really taking grip now.

“I feel flat.” “Numb.” “Nothing – I don’t know.” “Unmotivated.” “Hopeless.” “Bored.” “Isolated.” “Lethargic.” “Its like being in prison.”

Fed up of being at home, yet anxious about going back to school. Many of the teenagers do not turn on their videos on their online classes as they do not want to be seen. They are too self-conscious. They speak into an abyss. They are not having even the face to face contact we may think they are having in their lessons.

As we approach the anniversary mark of when Lockdown began, we are all aware that we have lost a year of our lives. In the life of a child, this has huge significance. Each year marks a huge developmental milestone that is essential they make for their wellbeing. A child in year 7 was unable to have the ending they needed to leave their primary school and move into Secondary School. They have been unable to make friends as they would do if they were regularly attending school and are instead stuck alone in their bedroom. Isolated.

Older teenagers have been unable to sit their GCSES and A-Levels and have lost that sense of achievement they may receive when they see their grades. A feeling of accomplishment and thus a boost to their self esteem. I heard how one child just felt flat on receiving her grades, despite them being good, she didn’t feel they were properly hers. Those who were sitting their A-Levels this year have had them whipped away from them, still unsure how they are going to be marked and by who. They have missed out on their whole sixth form experience. Do they bother going to University next year? Is there a guarantee they won’t be isolated in their room doing lectures online like this year’s unfortunate cohort. What about the parties, the socialising, the risk behaviour – all the things as parents we may dread, but all an essential part of growing up and separation that a child needs to do in preparation for adulthood.

How do we continue to support them?

An important thing to acknowledge and recognise is that we can’t make it all better. We can’t make the pandemic go away. We can’t be their teacher, be their friends. What we can do is be alongside them and just listen when they are feeling low. Give them a space to vent how angry and frustrated they are. We often feel helpless wanting to come up with ideas to make things better, but sometimes accepting we can’t can be really helpful.

Grief. They are dealing with a huge amount of grief. Loss of friends, teachers, grandparents, their freedom, who they were outside of the home. Grief throws up all sorts of emotions – anger, sadness, despair, rage and a recognition their life is out of their control. The path they thought they had has been changed and they have no idea what it looks like now.

Structure. Trying to encourage structure really is key. Getting dressed before online school. Walking round the block before the first lesson. Having 3 meals a day. Using their timetable to allocate mealtimes and snacks. Differentiating between weekends and weekdays.

Nature. Getting outdoors. Often such a struggle to convince them, but without a doubt the thing that lifts moods and can shift energy. Even if it is cold and wet, they then appreciate returning home to the warmth.

Empowerment. Be mindful of Tik Tok. Ask to see what is on their feed. I have been shocked by the trend for teenagers to list all the food they eat in a day and show their often very skinny bodies. If they are seeing this stuff, open up discussions about it. Wonder why girls are posting this and why they are placing so much importance on it. Eating Disorders often emerge as a way young people gain a sense of control in their lives. Their life feels out of their control at the moment so help them see what is in their control. Help them to feel empowered.

Other Adults. Having contact with other adults other than parents. Schools are their community and they have lost their community. Alongside their friends, feeling seen and important by other adults hugely impacts their self-esteem and worth. Drop your friends kids a note saying how well they are doing getting through this, knowing how tough it is for them. Let them know they are being thought about. Encourage your teens to send messages of support to younger kids so they feel they are supporting others. This encourages a feeling of purpose and wellbeing.

Screentime. As parents it can be hard witnessing the amount of time they spend on screens. Trying to get the balance right is really hard as this is often the only contact they have with friends and may be the only thing that is keeping them going at the moment. Make sure they have time off screens before going to sleep so their brains get a chance to unwind and slow down.

Photography. Getting outside and looking up and taking a photo is a wondrful mindful activity. Seeing what is around us. Finding the beauty in the simple things around us can produce serotonin.

Gratitude. Round the dinner table at night, encourage a conversation about what 5 things you feel grateful for today. It is important to bring in some positive thoughts.

S.A.D. The days are getting longer and the light is changing. Explain about Seasonal Affective Disorder and that it may be contributing to them feeling low, and that Spring is round that corner and it will feel better. Get them a Vitamin D spray or a lightbox may help.

Support Yourself. Essential to all the support you can offer is finding ways to support yourself. Unless you are well yourself and your own mental health is in check, you will be unable to support your children. Make sure you take time time out for yourself and do all you can to keep your own mood afloat.

I am running a 6 week online course offering support to those finding it hard at the moment to keep going, so please come along if you think you and therefore your family may benefit from you having that nurturing time for yourself once a week.

https://ameliawhitecounselling.com/therapeutic-support-group-for-women/

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